Scientists say philae’s comet may host alien life

The icy surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, home to the famous Philae lander, may also host alien life, according to astrobiologists.

Professor Chandra Wickramasinghe, director of the U.K.’s Buckingham Centre for Astrobiology, and Max Wallis of the University of Cardiff say that the comet could be home to living microbes. The scientists presented their research at the Royal Astronomical Society’s National Astronomy Meeting in Llandudno, Wales on Monday.

“The case we’re building includes what’s being discovered about comet CG’s [Churyumov-Gerasimenko’s] surface layers — mineral and carbonaceous dust forming a protective crust over a mix of complex carbon compounds and H2O,” explained Wallis, in an email to FoxNews.com. “[This] makes a positive habitat for micro-biology as the comet warms on nearing the sun.”

Wallis also cites the emission of gases from the comet last September before its “subcrust” had warmed as evidence of stored bio-gases being released.

Philae made headlines in November 2014 when it became the first probe to landon a comet, the culmination of an audacious 10-year mission. But when the lander settled into the shadow of a cliff three days later its solar panels were deprived of sunlight and it entered into “idle mode.” Last month, however, the European Space Agency lander began “waking up,” intermittently sending data to the Rosetta spacecraft orbiting the comet.

 “Rosetta has already shown that the comet is not to be seen as a deep-frozen inactive body, but supports geological processes and could be more hospitable to micro-life than our Arctic and Antarctic regions,” said Wallis, in a statement released by the Royal Astronomical Society.  The experts cite further evidence of life in Philae’s detection of complex organic molecules on the comet’s surface and in infrared images taken by Rosetta.

According to the scientists’ research, the comet’s micro-organisms probably require liquid water bodies to colonize the comet and could inhabit cracks in its ice and “snow.”

The comet, which is travelling at more than 73,000 mph, is currently about 176.7 million miles from Earth, according to Sky News

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Do you wonder if someone unfriended you on facebook or how you are no longer friends? here’s how to find out for sure

It’s always alarming to search for an old friend on Facebook only to realize they have since unfriended you. Now, you can save yourself a little mental anguish with an app that shows you in real time who’s given you the Facebook boot.

Aptly named Who Deleted Me, the program is available as an app for iOS and Android or as a browser extension for Google Chrome.

Just like the Twitter app Who Unfollowed Me, the program tells you whether a friend has unfollowed you or just deactivated their account.

The apps launched a few weeks ago, but the extension has been around in some form since 2009.

Who Deleted Me only starts tallying your friend totals once you’ve downloaded it, so you can’t get a read on past friendships lost — only the platonic breakups that happened after signing up.

And as an extra stalking bonus, you can also see the last time your friends logged on to the social network.

Note: The app has experienced some outages due to the extra attention (330,000 of their 500,000 users signed up just this month), but a spokesperson for the company told BuzzFeed they are working on it.

Make new friends and delete the old / One is silver and the other is…unfriended.

This Is How To See Who Unfriended You On Facebook

Inventor of facebook Mark Zuckerberg says the future of communication is telepathy. This is how its going to work

Internet satellites, virtual reality, even real working AI: It all pales in comparison to the future that Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg has in mind.

In a Q&A session with site users on Tuesday, the 31-year-old said he envisions a world where people — presumably Facebook users — don’t need these types of communication intermediaries. Instead, they’ll communicate brain-to-brain, using telepathy.

“One day, I believe we’ll be able to send full rich thoughts to each other directly using technology,” Zuckerberg wrote in response to a question about what’s next for Facebook. “You’ll just be able to think of something and your friends will immediately be able to experience it too.”

But hold up: Is that even possible? And is that something anyone actually wants?

TL;DR: Theoretically, yes; and, er — maybe not.

How to read a mind

To understand how Zuckerberg’s vision would theoretically work, you have to understand how the brain works, too.

In a nutshell, your nervous system is composed of cells called neurons, which communicate with each other using chemical signals called neurotransmitters. When a neuron receives one of these signals, it generates a tiny electrical spike. And because millions of these signals are required for everything your brain does — clicking your mouse, reading this text, remembering breakfast, you name it — your brain is basically sending off pinpricks of electrical energy all the time.

The cool thing about this, of course, is that scientists can measure and map this electrical activity using existing technologies like EEG and fMRI machines. And once they have enough maps, they can begin to read them — a point that neuroscientists and researchers are just now approaching.

At the University of California at Berkeley, a team of cognitive scientists have managed to reconstruct clips of movies their subjects were watching, based solely on measurements of their brainwaves. “You could not see the close-up details,” wrote the theoretical physicist Michio Kaku after watching one of the “movies,” “[but] you could clearly identify the kind of object you were seeing.”

How to send a thought

This is all well and good and interesting, of course, but the technology Zuckerberg envisions is a two-way street: How could we not only “read” a mind but also get that pattern of electrical signals into someone else’s head?

There are invasive options; i.e. implanting some kind of device in your brain. In 2013, scientists at Duke University implanted two lab rats with microelectrode arrays and taught one of the rats to press one of two levers. Afterwards, the second rat, who had not been trained, also seemed to know which level to push: It had received neural signals from the first rat, via the implant.

Recently, researchers have also had some luck with a noninvasive technique called transcranial magnetic stimulation, or TMS. When you put on a TMS headset it generates a magnetic field over your scalp, which can be used to activate neural pathways. Last fall, test subjects in India were able to use TMS  to “think” the words “hola” and “ciao” to test subjects in France; the process was painfully slow, however, and the words weren’t sent in their entirety — they had to be encoded as binary digits, uploaded to the Internet, sent, downloaded and then decoded as flashes of light. (WHEW.)

An overview of the brain-to-brain (B2B) communication system used by researchers to send the words “ciao” and “hello.” It’s really complicated. (Grau et al/PLOS One)

This is, while promising, a really clunky system. It’s unsophisticated (no one has yet “sent” an actual emotion or idea), it’s inexact (the rat still chose the wrong lever sometimes), and it’s slower than virtually every other form of modern communication, save perhaps snail mail. These experiments also required access to some very expensive, sophisticated equipment. Even if you wanted to, you could not try this at home.

“‘Telepathy’ technology remains so crude that it’s unlikely to have any practical impact,” wrote Mark Harris at the MIT Technology Review.

That said, these are only the very earliest days of telepathy research, and new developments are in the works. Among other things, researchers are looking into handheld, cellphone-sized MRI machines that would make it easier and cheaper to capture your own brain activity. And the Army is developing a telepathy helmet, almost like a VR headset, that would condense and simplify all this electrical signal-sending — although that, experts say, is still decades away.

Where Facebook fits in

Is Facebook currently developing any technology in this vein? A spokesperson for the company did not immediately respond to The Washington Post’s request for comment, though Facebook’s Research division — the arm of the company that studies machine learning, AI and virtual reality — has not published any work on brain-to-brain communication and does not appear to employ any researchers in the field.

But even if Facebook isn’t leading the charge toward telepathy — a worrying concept, in itself, given the site’s past indiscretions re: research consent and user privacy — the field poses tons of ethical challenges, if only in theory. How would you control who “spoke” to you? What’s to stop someone from sending you disturbing or abusive thoughts, or otherwise “hacking” your brain? And if these signals are moderated by some third-party technology, like a headset or helmet, will they be recorded somehow and saved, and by whom and for what purpose? Could they be hijacked by advertisers like the ones in “Minority Report,” who tailor interactive billboards to private thoughts?

“John Anderton!” one calls out, “you could use a Guinness right about now!”

There are, as of yet, no answers to these questions: An academic paper on the ethics of brain-to-brain technology, published in 2014, warned that there is neither legislation nor formal academic protocol for this type of research. (The writers predicted that could eventually provoke “public uproar.”)

For now, however, such concern is many breakthroughs and advances away. Zuckerberg himself may be getting up in years by the time we’re communicating telepathically.

source

washingtonpost

Transgender German man give birth to a baby

A Berlin man has become the first in Germany to give birth to a baby.
He identifies as male, but has a female reproductive system.
The baby boy was born on March 18th this year in a home birth, as hospitals are required to write the name of the mother in their records when a child is born.

It was delivered with the help of a midwife in the Neukölln area of Berlin.
On government records the new father, who is transgender, is registered as a man.
This makes him the first male in Germany to give birth, Berlin newspapers reported on Monday.
He reportedly became pregnant through a sperm donation.
Officially the child does not have a mother, only a father.
The case is reminiscent of transgender Thomas Beatie who has given birth to three children in the US.
Transgender people are able to give birth to children because even when a woman undergoes hormone therapy to become more physically masculine, they can retain female organs.

pregnant german man 2

Early life

Born Tracy Lehuanani LaGondino, Beatie was born and raised in Honolulu, Hawaii, the first of two children. His mother was from San Francisco, and of English, Irish, Scottish, and Welsh descent. His father, of Korean and Filipino decent, was born and raised in Hawaii.[5] As a teenager, Beatie was a female model and Miss Teen Hawaii USA pageant finalist.[6] He appeared regularly on the nationally televised aerobics workout series and video, Basic Training with Ada Janklowicz, and later became a competitive bodybuilder.

In 1996, Beatie graduated from the University of Hawaii with a bachelor’s degree in Health Science (Pre-med) and later pursued an Executive MBA. In 1997, he founded Define Normal, a progressive clothing company, which has since expanded in federal trademark to film and video production. He competed in full-contact fighting and was a black belt and tournament champion in Taekwondo.

Gender transition and marriage

At the age of 10, Beatie started to self-identify with the male gender.[12] At 23 years old, he began testosterone hormone treatment to transition to living life as a man.

pregnant german man 1

source : nairaland , wikipedia

 

53-year-old woman undergoes life threatening surgery removing her 30-pound breast implants

A woman with 30lb breasts who was told by multiple plastic surgeons that it would be impossible to remove her massive implants, has finally has finally had them taken out – despite the risk of the tissue on her bust turning black and dying during the complex procedure.

On Sunday night’s episode of E! reality series Botched, Dee Stein, 53, from Los Vegas, traveled to Los Angeles to meet with surgeons Paul Nassif and Terry Dubrow in the hopes that they would be willing to take on her ‘impossible’ case and reconstruct her breasts after removing her engorged and deflated implants.

‘Dee’s case by far in away is the most difficult, scariest, challenging, nearly impossible that I have ever seen or ever heard about in plastic surgery,’ Dr Dubrow explained.

Scroll down for video 

Desperate measures: Dee (pictured) says she is willing to risk her life to have Dr Terry Dubrow and Dr Pual Nassif remove her massive breast implants and salvage her breasts on the upcoming episode of Botched

Desperate measures: Dee (pictured) says she is willing to risk her life to have Dr Terry Dubrow and Dr Pual Nassif remove her massive breast implants and salvage her breasts on the upcoming episode of Botched

Old fashioned surgery: Dee's 20-year-old double-lumen breast implants are 3,000cc and made up of an internal lumen consisting of silicone and an external lumen that is filled with saline

Old fashioned surgery: Dee's 20-year-old double-lumen breast implants are 3,000cc and made up of an internal lumen consisting of silicone and an external lumen that is filled with saline

Old fashioned surgery: Dee’s 20-year-old double-lumen breast implants are 3,000cc and made up of an internal lumen consisting of silicone and an external lumen that is filled with saline

Dr Dubrow went on to show Dr Nassif images of Dee’s bust, noting there is a ‘screaming, complaining breast’ on the right side and a deflated ‘disaster’ on the other.

Dee’s ‘old fashioned double-lumen implants’ were 20 years old and featured an internal lumen that was made up of silcone and an external lumen that was filled with saline.

And Dr Dubrow explained that it looked like the saline part on the outside has ruptured on her left breast, causing it to deflate.

‘It is days until this turns into an enormous, major medical emergency for her,’ he told Dr Nassif. ‘The whole breast is going to die.’

Meanwhile, Dee revealed to the cameras that she had seen numerous plastic surgeons, all of whom had denied her the surgery she so desperately needed because of how high-risk the procedure would be.

Botched surgery: Dee's the outer saline part of her left breast implant ruptured, causing it to deflate 

Botched surgery: Dee’s the outer saline part of her left breast implant ruptured, causing it to deflate

Life-threatening: In addition to Dee's pain, the state of her breast implants are on the verge of becoming a major medical emergency

Life-threatening: In addition to Dee's pain, the state of her breast implants are on the verge of becoming a major medical emergency

Life-threatening: In addition to Dee’s pain, the state of her breast implants are on the verge of becoming a major medical emergency

‘I’ve gone to a lot of doctors that told me that they simply cannot fix me,’ she said tearfully. ‘I totally feel like I don’t have anybody else to turn to at this point.’

And Dr Nassif noted to the cameras: ‘One word to describe Dee’s breasts: wow.’

Dee explained that growing up she always wanted bigger breasts. She had a small size A cup and felt ‘short changed’ in the boob department.

When she took up a position as a professional dancer – in order to provide for her son – the club where she worked sponsored her breast augmentation, the cost of which she was later required to work off. Dee took her size A breasts to what she believes was close to a size FFF with 500cc implants.

But Dee noticed that women with even larger breasts were making more money than she was, so she tripled the size of her implants to 1,300 cc, taking her to an H cup.

Big dreams: Dee had size A breasts (pictured) when she was younger and got her first set of 500 cc implants when she was working as a dancer

Big dreams: Dee had size A breasts when she was younger and got her first set of 500 cc implants (pictured) when she was working as a dancer

Big dreams: Dee had size A breasts (left) when she was younger and got her first set of 500 cc implants (right) when she was working as a dancer

Fame game: Dee eventually had her doctor take her implants to a size 3,000 cc (pictured). Her large breasts helped her land spreads in numerous magazines featuring women with enormous busts

Fame game: Dee eventually had her doctor take her implants to a size 3,000 cc (pictured). Her large breasts helped her land spreads in numerous magazines featuring women with enormous busts

Fame game: Dee eventually had her doctor take her implants to a size 3,000 cc (left and right). Her large breasts helped her land spreads in numerous magazines featuring women with enormous busts

She later had her doctor put tissue expanders inside her bust to take her breast implants up to a massive 3,000 cc.

Dee’s engorged breasts made her famous, and soon she was a featured entertainer, traveling all over the world. She posed for numerous magazines featuring large breasted women, including Jugs and Gents.

Her doctor insisted that the massive implants were completely safe and even claimed that even if she got into a car accident, nothing would happen to her implants.

However, despite his reassurance, Dee’s left breast deflated and began leaking saline into her body, while her other implant felt like a rock.

‘I feel like a walking boob and it is killing me inside because I know I am so much better than that,’ she said.

Support system: Dee's son (far left), who is in medical school, joined her during her consultation with Dr Nassif (far right) and Dr Dubrow (near right) 

Support system: Dee’s son (far left), who is in medical school, joined her during her consultation with Dr Nassif (far right) and Dr Dubrow (near right)

At last: Dr Dubrow agreed to take on Dee's high-risk surgery because her breasts are ruining her life and are a 'major medical problem'

At last: Dr Dubrow agreed to take on Dee’s high-risk surgery because her breasts are ruining her life and are a ‘major medical problem’

She also wanted her son Anthony, who is a medical student, to be proud of her.

Dee arrived to her consultation with Dr Dubrow and Dr Nassif with her son by her side.

‘It has been extremely difficult dealing with my mother’s situation and I hope she can walk out of this stronger and honestly be able to experience the world as a normal person,’ Anthony said.

During her meeting with the doctors, Dee explained that she was a dancer ‘quite a few years ago’ when she got her first breast implants.

‘It is insane to think that any plastic surgeon would even consider Dee’s breasts to this level,’ Dr Dubrow noted. ‘The human body is not even equipped to handle this kind of volume expansion in breast tissue.’

And Dee told the doctors: ‘I came to you today because I have been told I probably cannot be fixed.’

Dangerous poison: After taking out Dee's implant, he noticed there was a ball of fungus growing inside it 

Dangerous poison: After taking out Dee’s implant, he noticed there was a ball of fungus growing inside it

Before and after: Dr Dubrow was able to salvage Dee's breast tissue and give her size D implants

Before and after: Dr Dubrow was able to salvage Dee's breast tissue and give her size D implants (pictured)

Before and after: Dr Dubrow was able to salvage Dee’s breast tissue and give her size D implants (right)

Living the dream: Dee was ecstatic that she was finally able to live a normal life at 53-years-old

Living the dream: Dee was ecstatic that she was finally able to live a normal life at 53-years-old

Living the dream: Dee was ecstatic that she was finally able to live a normal life at 53-years-old

Knowing that her son is in medical school, Dr Dubrow turned Dee’s plight into a learning moment for her son and asked him why no other doctor will attempt to operate.

‘I think there is a certain level of confidence is removing them,’ Anthony told Dr Dubrow, noting that they have been in her mother’s body for 20 years and there is the question of what they are going to do with what is left over after her implants are taken out.

‘Many doctors do not have the confidence in what they can do to make that normal,’ he added.

Dr Dubrow agreed before saying: ‘In their defense, it is so high risk why would any doctor want to tackle this?’

While Dr Dubrow said that most plastic surgeons would say there is nothing that can be done to save Dee’s breasts, he was willing to try because not only were they ruining her life, but they were also a ‘major medical problem’.

Army man: Griffin is a veteran who needed the doctors to fix his deviated septum so he could breathe in the Middle East 

Army man: Griffin is a veteran who needed the doctors to fix his deviated septum so he could breathe in the Middle East

Artist at work: Dr Nassif explained that he would need to take cartilage and tissue from other parts of his body to straighten his nose and fix his deviated septum 

Artist at work: Dr Nassif explained that he would need to take cartilage and tissue from other parts of his body to straighten his nose and fix his deviated septum

However, Dee noted to the cameras: ‘I’d risk my life for it at this point because I am so uncomfortable. I am in a lot of pain’.

Dr Dubrow explained: ‘I have to take this case on. You cannot leave this woman with these breast that may be developing a breast cancer that will go on to infection.

‘Somebody has to help her.’

For phase one of Dee’s surgeries, Dr Dubrow had to remove her 3,000 cc implants from each breast without rupturing their saline or silicone cores.

The surgeon explained that Dee’s breast tissue was far too thin to do anything else with them at that time, adding that, if he tried to do anything further, her ‘nipples would fall off’.

‘Her immune system as used everything it can to fight off the pressure that her implants have caused on her tissue,’ he said.

Great work: Dr Nassif was able to straighten Griffin's nose (pictured) and clear his deviated septum so he could finally breathe
Great work: Dr Nassif was able to straighten Griffin's nose (pictured) and clear his deviated septum so he could finally breathe

Great work: Dr Nassif was able to straighten Griffin’s nose (right) and clear his deviated septum so he could finally breathe

Finally free: 'It feels great being able to breathe again,' Griffin said after the surgery
Finally free: 'It feels great being able to breathe again,' Griffin said after the surgery (pictured)

Finally free: ‘It feels great being able to breathe again,’ Griffin said after the surgery

Dr Dubrow also noticed that there was a ‘fungus ball’ inside the implant that could have made her seriously ill if it had leaked out.

Because there wasn’t enough blood supply to sustain a breast lift, Dr Dubrow knew that he possibly would have to remove her breasts, but he he hoped her tissue would cooperate during her recovery and give him something to work with.

For her second surgery, Dr Dubrow gave her smaller implants that would give her a D cup, while removing excess skin, noting that it was the most excess skin he has ever had to remove in his entire career.

Throughout both surgeries, his main concern was keeping her nipples and breast tissue alive, explaining: ‘If they turn black, fall off and die, that’s my fault.’

However, despite the odds, Dr Dubrow was able to dramatically transform Dee’s bust, while keeping her nipples intact.

Heroic vision: Herbert Chavez (pictured) has had 23 surgeries to make him look like Superman 

Heroic vision: Herbert Chavez (pictured) has had 23 surgeries to make him look like Superman

Dedicated to his cause: The 37-year-old from the Philippines said he wants to become the 'Man of Plastic'  

Dedicated to his cause: The 37-year-old from the Philippines said he wants to become the ‘Man of Plastic’

‘What he as done for me is truly amazing,’ Dee said.

Clearly thrilled with her new appearance, Dee couldn’t wait to show her son the results of her surgeries during a video chat.

Anthony was also incredibly happy for his mother, who had a newfound confidence that she didn’t have before.

Another patient featured on this episode was a veteran named Josh, who couldn’t breathe properly through his nose, which he had broken numerous times after accidents and physical altercations.

After joining the military, a doctor told him he could fix his deviated septum and straighten his nose before he was deployed, but despite the promise, Griffin still couldn’t breathe through his nose, which was crooked and wiggled when he spoke.

Griffin had recently finished his second tour in the Middle East and he explained that it is tough being in the desert and having to breathe through his mouth.

‘The last thing I want to do when I am trying to save somebody else’s life or try to preserve my own is worry about being able to breathe,’ he explained.

New request: Herbert asked the doctors to give him a permanent six-pack 

New request: Herbert asked the doctors to give him a permanent six-pack

No can do: Because Herbert's body was filled with injections that are illegal in the US, Dr Dubrow and Dr Nassif turned him away because the risks outweighed the results 

No can do: Because Herbert’s body was filled with injections that are illegal in the US, Dr Dubrow and Dr Nassif turned him away because the risks outweighed the results

And Dr Dubrow noted during Griffin’s consultation: ‘This is the most deviated nose I’ve ever seen.’

Dr Nassif said he was would need to take cartilage and tissue from other parts of his body in order to reconstruct his nose.

Although Dr Nassif was worried about running into the same issues as Griffin’s first surgeon did, he was able to straighten his nose and fix his blocked septum.

‘It feels great being able to breath again,’ Griffin said happily after his nose had heeled following his surgery.

During the episode, the doctors also saw Herbert Chavez, from the Philippines, who is obsessed with Superman and hopes to become the ‘Man of Plastic’.

Herbert, who already 23 surgeries to look more like Superman, wanted the doctors to give him a permanent six-pack like the Man of Steel.

However, many of Herbert’s previous surgeries involved treatments and injections that are illegal in the US and only allowed in the Philippines.

Because he had so much poison in his body, Dr Dubrow told him that the risks outweighed the benefits of surgery and there was nothing that they could do.

‘This superhero needs to get in the gym,’ he told Herbert.

(VIDEO)

Bugatti Veyron and Lamborghini Aventador race through the tunnels at Manchester Airport

This incredible video captures two of the world’s most high-powered supercars racing each other through the tunnels at Manchester Airport.

Filmed by a passenger in the vehicle behind, the footage shows a white Lamborghini Aventador taking on a black Bugatti Veyron on an empty stretch of theA538 Wilmslow Road.

The 30-second clip shows the cars battling for position in the exact spot where footballer Cristiano Ronaldo wrote off his Ferrari in 2009 after crashing it into a roadside barrier in the tunnel.

Scroll down for video

Supercars: The Bugatti Veyron, right, and Lamborghini Aventador outside the tunnel near Manchester Airport

Supercars: The Bugatti Veyron, right, and Lamborghini Aventador outside the tunnel near Manchester Airport

Race: The £1.2million Bugatti is filmed speeding past the camera in the deserted right-hand lane

Race: The £1.2million Bugatti is filmed speeding past the camera in the deserted right-hand lane

Challenge: With a roar of the engine, the Lamborghini, which costs £260,000 comes up from behind

Challenge: With a roar of the engine, the Lamborghini, which costs £260,000 comes up from behind

The £1.2million Bugatti – which can reach top speeds of more than 250mph – is seen coming up on the right-hand lane before zooming ahead and crossing in front.

(VIDEO)

Approach: The Laborghini catches up with the Bugatti - which can reach speeds of more than 253 mph

Approach: The Laborghini catches up with the Bugatti – which can reach speeds of more than 253 mph

Dead heat: The two supercars pull in front of the camera car - which was travelling at 50mph

Dead heat: The two supercars pull in front of the camera car – which was travelling at 50mph

Taking the lead: In a swift movement, the Lamborghini zooms ahead of the Bugatti and drives out of the tunnel

Taking the lead: In a swift movement, the Lamborghini zooms ahead of the Bugatti and drives out of the tunnel

The men rolled their windows down to hear the roar of the cars as they sped off in front of them, capturing the deafening sound of the engine on camera.

He added: ‘We were doing 50mph so you can only imagine how fast they were going’.

In 2009, Ronaldo, then a Manchester United player, made headlines when he crashed his Ferrari on the A538 Wilmslow Road.

In 2009, footballer Cristiano Ronaldo made headlines when he crashed his Ferrari on the A538 Wilmslow Road

In 2009, footballer Cristiano Ronaldo made headlines when he crashed his Ferrari on the A538 Wilmslow Road

 

 

This Will Change The Way You Drive On Highways Forever

Technology opens the doors to many new possibilities.

It can enable us to do the most complicated things such as flying to the moon, to more mundane things like automatically opening a door for us. Sometimes we get too used to it and we take it for granted, but I don’t think we should.

Let me explain: as we all know driving can be very dangerous. One of the most dangerous parts of it is overtaking large trucks on single lane highways, and this in some countries is the largest source of accidents. Samsung has used the power of technology to reduce the number of accidents that occur in these situation. Watch the video and let us know what you think.

Easy Computer Hacks (Short Cuts)

More than 100 Keyboard Shortcuts must read & Share

Keyboard Shortcuts (Microsoft Windows)
1. CTRL+C (Copy)
2. CTRL+X (Cut)
… 3. CTRL+V (Paste)
4. CTRL+Z (Undo)
5. DELETE (Delete)
6. SHIFT+DELETE (Delete the selected item permanently without placing the item in the Recycle Bin)
7. CTRL while dragging an item (Copy the selected item)
8. CTRL+SHIFT while dragging an item (Create a shortcut to the selected item)
9. F2 key (Rename the selected item)
10. CTRL+RIGHT ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the next word)
11. CTRL+LEFT ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the previous word)
12. CTRL+DOWN ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the next paragraph)
13. CTRL+UP ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the previous paragraph)
14. CTRL+SHIFT with any of the arrow keys (Highlight a block of text)
SHIFT with any of the arrow keys (Select more than one item in a window or on the desktop, or select text in a document)
15. CTRL+A (Select all)
16. F3 key (Search for a file or a folder)
17. ALT+ENTER (View the properties for the selected item)
18. ALT+F4 (Close the active item, or quit the active program)
19. ALT+ENTER (Display the properties of the selected object)
20. ALT+SPACEBAR (Open the shortcut menu for the active window)
21. CTRL+F4 (Close the active document in programs that enable you to have multiple documents opensimultaneously)
22. ALT+TAB (Switch between the open items)
23. ALT+ESC (Cycle through items in the order that they had been opened)
24. F6 key (Cycle through the screen elements in a window or on the desktop)
25. F4 key (Display the Address bar list in My Computer or Windows Explorer)
26. SHIFT+F10 (Display the shortcut menu for the selected item)
27. ALT+SPACEBAR (Display the System menu for the active window)
28. CTRL+ESC (Display the Start menu)
29. ALT+Underlined letter in a menu name (Display the corresponding menu) Underlined letter in a command name on an open menu (Perform the corresponding command)
30. F10 key (Activate the menu bar in the active program)
31. RIGHT ARROW (Open the next menu to the right, or open a submenu)
32. LEFT ARROW (Open the next menu to the left, or close a submenu)
33. F5 key (Update the active window)
34. BACKSPACE (View the folder onelevel up in My Computer or Windows Explorer)
35. ESC (Cancel the current task)
36. SHIFT when you insert a CD-ROMinto the CD-ROM drive (Prevent the CD-ROM from automatically playing)
Dialog Box – Keyboard Shortcuts
1. CTRL+TAB (Move forward through the tabs)
2. CTRL+SHIFT+TAB (Move backward through the tabs)
3. TAB (Move forward through the options)
4. SHIFT+TAB (Move backward through the options)
5. ALT+Underlined letter (Perform the corresponding command or select the corresponding option)
6. ENTER (Perform the command for the active option or button)
7. SPACEBAR (Select or clear the check box if the active option is a check box)
8. Arrow keys (Select a button if the active option is a group of option buttons)
9. F1 key (Display Help)
10. F4 key (Display the items in the active list)
11. BACKSPACE (Open a folder one level up if a folder is selected in the Save As or Open dialog box)

Microsoft Natural Keyboard Shortcuts
1. Windows Logo (Display or hide the Start menu)
2. Windows Logo+BREAK (Display the System Properties dialog box)
3. Windows Logo+D (Display the desktop)
4. Windows Logo+M (Minimize all of the windows)
5. Windows Logo+SHIFT+M (Restorethe minimized windows)
6. Windows Logo+E (Open My Computer)
7. Windows Logo+F (Search for a file or a folder)
8. CTRL+Windows Logo+F (Search for computers)
9. Windows Logo+F1 (Display Windows Help)
10. Windows Logo+ L (Lock the keyboard)
11. Windows Logo+R (Open the Run dialog box)
12. Windows Logo+U (Open Utility Manager)
13. Accessibility Keyboard Shortcuts
14. Right SHIFT for eight seconds (Switch FilterKeys either on or off)
15. Left ALT+left SHIFT+PRINT SCREEN (Switch High Contrast either on or off)
16. Left ALT+left SHIFT+NUM LOCK (Switch the MouseKeys either on or off)
17. SHIFT five times (Switch the StickyKeys either on or off)
18. NUM LOCK for five seconds (Switch the ToggleKeys either on or off)
19. Windows Logo +U (Open Utility Manager)
20. Windows Explorer Keyboard Shortcuts
21. END (Display the bottom of the active window)
22. HOME (Display the top of the active window)
23. NUM LOCK+Asterisk sign (*) (Display all of the subfolders that are under the selected folder)
24. NUM LOCK+Plus sign (+) (Display the contents of the selected folder)

MMC Console keyboard shortcuts
1. SHIFT+F10 (Display the Action shortcut menu for the selected item)
2. F1 key (Open the Help topic, if any, for the selected item)
3. F5 key (Update the content of all console windows)
4. CTRL+F10 (Maximize the active console window)
5. CTRL+F5 (Restore the active console window)
6. ALT+ENTER (Display the Properties dialog box, if any, for theselected item)
7. F2 key (Rename the selected item)
8. CTRL+F4 (Close the active console window. When a console has only one console window, this shortcut closes the console)

Remote Desktop Connection Navigation
1. CTRL+ALT+END (Open the Microsoft Windows NT Security dialog box)
2. ALT+PAGE UP (Switch between programs from left to right)
3. ALT+PAGE DOWN (Switch between programs from right to left)
4. ALT+INSERT (Cycle through the programs in most recently used order)
5. ALT+HOME (Display the Start menu)
6. CTRL+ALT+BREAK (Switch the client computer between a window and a full screen)
7. ALT+DELETE (Display the Windows menu)
8. CTRL+ALT+Minus sign (-) (Place a snapshot of the active window in the client on the Terminal server clipboard and provide the same functionality as pressing PRINT SCREEN on a local computer.)
9. CTRL+ALT+Plus sign (+) (Place asnapshot of the entire client window area on the Terminal server clipboardand provide the same functionality aspressing ALT+PRINT SCREEN on a local computer.)

Microsoft Internet Explorer Keyboard Shortcuts
1. CTRL+B (Open the Organize Favorites dialog box)
2. CTRL+E (Open the Search bar)
3. CTRL+F (Start the Find utility)
4. CTRL+H (Open the History bar)
5. CTRL+I (Open the Favorites bar)
6. CTRL+L (Open the Open dialog box)
7. CTRL+N (Start another instance of the browser with the same Web address)
8. CTRL+O (Open the Open dialog box,the same as CTRL+L)
9. CTRL+P (Open the Print dialog box)
10. CTRL+R (Update the current Web page)
11. CTRL+W (Close the current window)

Ever wonder why Swiss cheese has holes? Swiss cheese hole mystery finally solved

Scientists have finally solved a mystery that has baffled them for a century – why does Swiss cheese have holes?

Contrary to what cartoons have suggested over the years, the holes are not made by mice eating their way through the cheese.

Swiss laboratory says they are created by flecks of hay. These “microscopically small hay particles” get into the milk and create holes as the liquid matures into cheese.

Agroscope, a government agricultural institute, said “microscopically small hay particles” would fall in to buckets collecting milk, and develop into bigger holes as the cheese matures.

The process affects only some Swiss cheeses, such as Emmental and Appenzell.

The discovery also solves another riddle – why the famous holes in cheeses like Emmentaler or Appenzeller have been getting smaller or disappearing completely over the last 15 years.

Scientists reached their conclusions after adding small amounts of hay dust to milk and making it into cheese over 130 days. The research has not been peer reviewed.

 

World’s most extensive face transplant turns out a success. Man with face transplant meets sister of his donor

A man who had a face transplant three years ago has met the sister of his donor for the first time.

Rebekah Aversano’s brother, Joshua, died in a car accident in 2012 and the family agreed to donate his face to Richard Lee Norris for what was the world’s most extensive face transplant at the time.

This is the moment that a woman sees – and touches – the face of her dead brother on another person for the first time following a groundbreaking transplant.

It’s a union that she finds overwhelmingly emotional.

The transplant took place thanks to the family of Joshua Aversano, 21, who was tragically killed in a car accident. The incredible meeting between his sister Rebekah and recipient, Richard Norris, has been filmed for 60 Minutes on Nine.

39-year-old Richard Norris (right) suffered horrific injuries in the 1997 shotgun accident. Rebekah Aversano (left) and her family made the decision in 2012 to donate her dead 21-year-old brother's face for transplant. Their meeting is catalogued by the 60 Minutes Australia crew this Sunday night

39-year-old Richard Norris (right) suffered horrific injuries in the 1997 shotgun accident. Rebekah Aversano (left) and her family made the decision in 2012 to donate her dead 21-year-old brother’s face for transplant. Their meeting is catalogued by the 60 Minutes Australia crew this Sunday night

Joshua Aversano (left) was killed when hit by a van in 2012. His family donated his face for transplant to shooting victim Richard Norris (after the transplant, right)

Rebekah Aversano looks on in amazement after meeting Richard Norris for the first time. 'This is the face I grew up with' she tells him
Rebekah Aversano looks on in amazement after meeting Richard Norris for the first time. ‘This is the face I grew up with’ she tells him

The family gave doctors permission to give his face to Norris, who was horribly disfigured almost 18 years ago when he accidentally blew off most of his face with a shotgun.

It was an operation which transformed his life.

The get-together was set up partly so that he could thank the Aversano family for ‘saving my life’.

As they meet for the first time at his home, Rebekah asks Richard: ‘Do you mind if I touch it?’

He responds: ‘No, not at all.’

She does and then steps back in amazement: ‘Wow, this is the face I grew up with.’

Norris underwent more than 30 operations to try and correct the damage and restore his features. The long and painful process resulted in little sign of improvement, leaving him depressed and at times suicidal.

When Rebekah and her family were first approached by doctors about the possibility of using her dead brother's face for transplant, they were shocked
Rebekah Aversano meets face transplant patient Richard Norris for the first time

When Rebekah and her family were first approached by doctors about the possibility of using her dead brother’s face for transplant, they were shocked

Incredible moment: Rebekah Aversano meeting Richard Norris for the first time since his transplant using the face of her late brother Joshua 

Incredible moment: Rebekah Aversano meeting Richard Norris for the first time since his transplant using the face of her late brother Joshua

Rebekah asks Richard: 'Do you mind if I touch it?' She does and then steps back in amazement, saying 'wow, this is the face I grew up with'

Rebekah asks Richard: ‘Do you mind if I touch it?’ She does and then steps back in amazement, saying ‘wow, this is the face I grew up with’

Emotional: Richard Norris and Rebekah Aversano embrace, the reunion proving overwhelming

Emotional: Richard Norris and Rebekah Aversano embrace, the reunion proving overwhelming

But three years ago, the tragedy in the Aversano family offered him a glimmer of hope. 

Norris, 39, underwent one of the most complex and expensive face transplants in history, receiving teeth, a jaw and even a tongue from his donor.

His mother, Gwen Aversano, told Canada’s CTV News network they knew it was ‘the right thing to do’.

‘We can definitely see our son in him. Some of the facial features would definitely be our son, so we could see similarities, very much so.’

‘We are just so pleased we have been able to help him, even though we had such a tragic loss, we were able to give someone else the benefit of our son.’

And the chances of finding a perfect match were very low.

Disfigured: When Richard Norris shot himself in the face in 1997 he lost his nose, lips and most movement in his mouth

Disfigured: When Richard Norris shot himself in the face in 1997 he lost his nose, lips and most movement in his mouth

Disfigured: When Richard Norris shot himself he lost his nose, lips and most movement in his mouth. The surgery took more than 36 hours

Life saving: Norris, 39, has had multiple life-saving, reconstructive surgeries but none as successful as this by Dr Rodriguez and his 150-strong team

Joshua's family was approached soon after his death with a request to donate his face for transplanting onto Richard Norris. They had already donated his organs

Joshua’s family was approached soon after his death with a request to donate his face for transplanting onto Richard Norris. They had already donated his organs

Norris said he is humbled by the gift he received from her late brother after Joshua was killed, struck by a minivan while crossing the street. He speaks to the Maryland family regularly and keeps them updated on his life and health.

‘I asked him if it really was worth the risk, he said “absolutely”, even though there was a 50 per cent chance it would fail,’ she added.

Part of the health battles, included a severe rejection episode when he was sunburnt.  He sent pictures of his face to the team of doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center, who told him to board a plane without delay.

He spent three weeks recovering from the episode in hospital.

The 36-hour hour operation was considered extremely controversial, as it was elective surgery, and Norris only had a 50 per cent chance of survival.

The result, however, was not only a new life for him, but a groundbreaking study for doctors learning to treat soldiers and other victims of severe facial injuries.

Norris was only 22 when his face ‘exploded’.

The story goes that he had arrived home after drinking and was arguing with his mother when he took a shotgun from his gun cabinet and told his mom he was going to shoot himself.

But when he went to place the gun down, it went off

Each day became a living nightmare for Norris as he faced cruelty from strangers whenever he ventured outdoors, fought addiction and contemplated suicide.

Dr Rodriguez led a 150-strong team in a 36 hour operation to transplant the new face on Richard Norris

Dr Rodriguez led a 150-strong team in a 36 hour operation to transplant the new face on Richard Norris

An MRI image of Richard Lee Norris re-constructed face transplant after being shot in the face
An MRI following the reconstruction and transplant

An MRI image of Richard Lee Norris re-constructed face transplant after being shot in the face (left) and the image following the reconstruction and transplant (at right)

The accident left Norris with no teeth, no nose and only part of his tongue. He was still able to taste but could not smell.

‘Those 10 years of hell I lived through, it has given me such a wealth of knowledge,’ Norris told Associated Press.

‘I’ve heard all kinds of remarks. A lot of them were really horrible.

‘It’s unreal. It has put some of the best people in my life.’

The doctor who performed the operation at the Maryland Medical Centre, Dr Eduardo Rodriguez, said when Norris opted to undergo the face-transplant intense procedure, he was agreeing to take on an enormous responsibility.

He said, the face isn’t an organ like a liver or a heart, which are regularly transplanted.

The face is more like a hand or foot, and Richard Norris’ body will always regard his new face as a foreign object, causing his immune system to constantly attack it.

He will take a cocktail of anti-rejection drugs for the rest of his life, lowering his immune system and leaving him vulnerable to many health problems.

He is also not allowed to drink, smoke, get sunburned or risk injury, all of which will only worsen the rejection.

A serious rejection results in death.

‘He never really thought about himself in all of this,’ Dr Rodriguez told GQ magazine.

Grateful: Richard Norris sits in the office of Dr. Eduardo Rodriguez, who led the surgical team that performed the face transplant. He undergoes regular checks because of the fear of his body rejecting the new face

Grateful: Richard Norris sits in the office of Dr. Eduardo Rodriguez, who led the surgical team that performed the face transplant. He undergoes regular checks because of the fear of his body rejecting the new face

Dr Eduardo Rodriguez inspects Norris' skin. In the years since a shotgun accident blew half of Norris' face off, he faced cruelty from strangers, fought addiction and contemplated suicide

Dr Eduardo Rodriguez inspects Norris’ skin. In the years since a shotgun accident blew half of Norris’ face off, he faced cruelty from strangers, fought addiction and contemplated suicide

When Norris saw his new face in a mirror for the first time, he wrote: 'The only thing I could do was hug Dr. Rodriguez'

When Norris saw his new face in a mirror for the first time, he wrote: ‘The only thing I could do was hug Dr. Rodriguez’

‘He’s always thought about helping the wounded warriors and the other people, and providing hope.

‘He’s a remarkable man.’

Before, whenever he ventured out in public, usually at night, he hid behind a hat and mask.

Norris had dozens of previous surgeries to try and repair his face, but eventually reached the limits of what conventional surgery could do for him, said Dr Rodriguez.

And it was that just weeks after Norris was told by another doctor that there was little else that could be done for him, Dr Rodriguez presented him with another option: a transplant.

The doctor, who is the chair of the plastic surgery department at NYU Langone Medical Centre, had been following advancements in the face transplant field for years.

A Naval Research grant, for the purpose of helping wounded warriors made it possible for him and his team to attempt their first face transplant, an operation that previously had been performed only twice in the US.

The world’s first partial face transplant was performed in France in 2005 on a woman who was mauled by her dog.

Of 27 other transplants that followed, four recipients have died.

Norris has had two serious episodes since the 2012 operation, and spent weeks in hospital on intravenous medication.

For the first time in many years, Richard recognises himself when he looks in the mirror and this Sunday night meets the woman who made the decision to allow him the face transplant

For the first time in many years, Richard recognises himself when he looks in the mirror and this Sunday night meets the woman who made the decision to allow him the face transplant

The rejection was the major danger in the first place. However, once Dr Rodriguez and his team began, there was no turning back.

If the transplant didn’t take, there would have been nothing left of his face and he would have died.

Norris’ mother, Sandra, remembers Dr Rodriguez saying there was a 50-50 chance her son would survive the surgery.

‘We looked at Richard and we told him we loved him the way he was and it didn’t matter to us, but it was his life,’ she said. ‘That was what he wanted to do and we supported him.’

Dr Rodriguez said if all goes well, a transplanted face could last 20 to 30 years.

Norris, who makes daily visual checks, gains more feeling in his new face as each day passes but the risk of rejection is never far from his mind.

‘Every day I wake up with that fear: Is this the day? The day I’m going to go into a state of rejection that is going to be so bad that the doctors can’t change it?’

Before the transplant, Norris rarely left his home. In addition to wearing a surgical mask and baseball cap on his infrequent trips out in public, he did his shopping at night so he wouldn’t have to face the stares of as many people.

‘I am now able to walk past people and no one even gives me a second look.’